New Website Launched for Comparative Studies of South Asia, Africa, and the Middle East (CSSAAME) Journal
NEW YORK, April 4, 2014 –

 

The Columbia Libraries/Information Services’ Center for Digital Research and Scholarship (CDRS) is pleased to announce the launch of a new website for the Comparative Studies of South Asia, Africa, and the Middle East (CSSAAME) journal. The journal seeks to be a forum for empirically grounded, theoretically engaged, and politically attuned scholarship about South Asia, Africa, and the Middle East.


CSSAAME published its first issue in 1981. It aims to bring regional and area studies into conversation and to work across temporal divides, asking how concepts and practices might be rethought and redeployed through new narratives of connection and comparison. The journal relocated its editorship to Columbia University in 2012, where the CSSAAME editorial collective seeks to renew this commitment. In recognizing the journal as a global and collaborative project, the collective is constantly in search of new ways to facilitate scholarship enabling new connections to be forged between area and theory.

CDRS collaborated with the CSSAAME editorial collective to launch a new website, which can now be explored at http://cssaamejournal.org. The website features a refreshed design, from which users can, with a subscription to the journal from Duke University Press, access the current issue of the journal as well as a selection of free, full-length articles, all part of the Duke-published journal. Alongside this content, the CSSAAME team has created CSSAAME Borderlines, an openly accessible online-only section of the journal found on the CSSAAME website, dedicated to original scholarship and to offering multimedia supplements to the print journal. By opening up this space to the public, CSSAAME is able to engage a wide range of interdisciplinary audiences all over the world with their free online content.

Senior editors of CSSAAME Timothy Mitchell, Professor and Chair of Columbia’s Department of Middle Eastern, South Asian, and African Studies, and Anupama Rao, Associate Professor of History at Barnard College, said: “We are thrilled to be able to launch this website in partnership with CDRS - whose support and feedback has been invaluable - to engage the new possibilities opened up by digital scholarship. For a journal such as ours with its global, non-Western focus, digital scholarship provides a new capacity for dissemination and debate not possible in a print journal. The platform allows us to engage emerging centers of non-western scholarship and take seriously the issues of location and language that define them. Additionally, we see this as an opportunity for thinking dialectically about the global mission of Columbia University for this new millennium in terms of scholarly ethics and responsibility.”

Rebecca Kennison, CDRS Director, commented: “It has been a pleasure to partner with the CSSAAME team to create a new platform for this important forum about South Asia, Africa, and the Middle East. We are especially pleased to be able to offer a new online-only section of the journal that will be freely available to scholars around the world, a resource we hope will be used widely.”

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The Center for Digital Research and Scholarship (CDRS) works to increase the utility and impact of research produced at Columbia by creating, adapting, implementing, supporting, and sustaining innovative digital tools and publishing platforms for content delivery, discovery, analysis, data curation, and preservation. The Center engages in extensive outreach, education, and advocacy to ensure that the scholarly work produced at Columbia University has a global reach and accelerates the pace of research across disciplines. CDRS is one of six entities that comprise the Digital Programs and Technology Services branch of Columbia University Libraries/Information Services.

Columbia University Libraries/Information Services is one of the top five academic research library systems in North America. The collections include over 11 million volumes, over 150,000 journals and serials, as well as extensive electronic resources, manuscripts, rare books, microforms, maps, and graphic and audio-visual materials. The services and collections are organized into 22 libraries and various academic technology centers. The Libraries employs more than 500 professional and support staff. The website of the Libraries is the gateway to its services and resources: library.columbia.edu.

The Comparative Studies of South Asia, Africa, and the Middle East (CSSAAME) journal seeks to be a forum for empirically grounded, theoretically engaged, and politically attuned scholarship about South Asia, Africa, and the Middle East. It can be explored online at http://cssaamejournal.org.

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LW April 2014