William L. Bottomley (1883-1951)


This collection contains architectural drawings by architect William L. Bottomley for projects in and around New York City, Westchester County, Long Island, New Jersey, and several Mid-Atlantic states, between 1913 and 1946.

Major projects represented in this collection include the Ernest P. Davies residence, Roslyn, NY (1916); the James Warburg residence alterations, New York City (1929); River House, New York City (1930-1931); the William Loew Goadby residence, Old Westbury, NY (1931-1932); the Robert Goelet residence, Georgetown, SC (1935); and the Eleanor Ryan residence, Washington, DC (1936).

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Born in New York City in 1883, Bottomley received his degree in architecture from Columbia University in 1906. After working briefly in the office of New York architects Heins & La Farge, and then in the New York State architect’s office in Albany, Bottomley left for Europe in 1907 to continue his studies. Funded by the McKim Fellowship, he first attended the American Academy in Rome and then the Ecole des Beaux-Arts in Paris.

Bottomley returned to New York City in about 1909 and practiced with various other architects through the late 1920s. Working primarily in a neo-classical vocabulary, Bottomley designed houses, apartments, and institutional buildings in New York City and along the East Coast. In 1928, he opened a partnership with William Sidney Wagner and A.J. White. Their best-known commission was the luxury apartment building known as River House, rising twenty-six stories along the East River at E. 52nd Street in New York City.

Bottomley, Wagner & White. River House, Manhattan, New York. 1930. Detail of lower stories. Bottomley, Wagner & White. River House, Manhattan, New York. 1930. Detail of lower stories.