Kristeller Lecture to Feature Anthony Grafton


NEW YORK, October 18, 2007 The 2007 Paul O. Kristeller Lecture will feature Anthony Grafton of Princeton University speaking on “The Culture of Correction: Humanism and the Practices of Publication in Renaissance Rome.” The event will be held at 6:00 p.m. on Thursday, November 8, at the Social Hall, Union Theological Seminary.

Professor Grafton will discuss the practices of publication in Renaissance Rome in what was then a culture of correction. His lecture will feature images from the Digital Scriptorium, an image database hosted by Columbia University Libraries of medieval and renaissance manuscripts that unites scattered resources from many institutions into an international tool for teaching and scholarly research.

A reception will immediately follow the program. Union Theological Seminary is located at 3041 Broadway at 121st Street. For more information regarding this event or to attend, please respond to cul-events@columbia.edu. To view a listing of events, visit www.alumni.libraries.columbia.edu.

Anthony Grafton’s special interests lie in the cultural history of Renaissance Europe, the history of books and readers, the history of scholarship and education in the West from Antiquity to the 19th century, and the history of science from Antiquity to the Renaissance. He also studies the long-term history of scholarly practices, such as forgery and the citation of sources, and has worked on many other topics in cultural and intellectual history. Grafton is the author of ten books and the coauthor, editor, coeditor, or translator of nine others. He has been the recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship (1989), the Los Angeles Times Book Prize (1993), the Balzan Prize for History of Humanities (2002), and the Mellon Foundation’s Distinguished Achievement Award (2003). He is the Henry Putnam University Professor of History and Director of the Center for Collaborative History at Princeton University

The Kristeller Occassional Lectures in Western Cultural History before 1800 are made possible by a bequest from the late Professor Kristeller to the Columbia University Libraries.

Columbia University Libraries is one of the top ten academic library systems in the nation, with 9.2 million volumes, over 65,650 serials, as well as extensive collections of electronic resources, manuscripts, rare books, microforms, and other nonprint formats. The collections and services are organized into 25 libraries, supporting specific academic or professional disciplines. Columbia Libraries employs more than 400 professional and support staff to assist faculty, students, and researchers in their academic endeavors. The Libraries’ website at http://www.columbia.edu/cu/lweb/ is a gateway to its print and electronic collections and to its services.

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10/18/07 LMK