Google Funds Video Project at Columbia’s Center for Digital Research and Scholarship


NEW YORK, July 11, 2007 Google™ has awarded Columbia University University Center for Digital Research and Scholarship a grant to support preparation and submission of video content from Columbia for the Google Video site.

The Center will prepare up to 54 hours of new content, as well as convert 38 hours of MPEG2 content for the Google Video site. Lectures, interviews, and course content covering such diverse areas of science, economy, history and world affairs will be featured.

The agreement is the result of an initiative by Google to add more meaningful educational content to the Google Video site, in particular course content from leading academic institutions. Browsers will be able to search Google Video by keyword, and download the video to Windows/Mac, Video iPod, or Sony PSP.

“This is a great opportunity to work with the world's most important technology company and to share Columbia’s rich educational resources with users from all over via Google Video,” said Jason Fox, Acting Director of Columbia University Center for Digital Research and Scholarship.

New content will include a number of events from the Earth Institute at Columbia University, including the Distinguished Lecture Series and the Seminars on Sustainable Development designed for general audiences from experts on current pressing global issues.

Course content will include the Frontiers of Science course, part of Columbia’s unique core curriculum for incoming students. Each semester, scientists in different disciplines deliver a series of three lectures each describing the background, context, and current state of an area of research.

In addition, the Center will convert selected existing video for the Google Video site, including the interviews and lectures on the architecture and development of New York City with Andrew S. Dolkart. Dolkart is professor of the Columbia School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation and leading authority of New York’s architecture and development.

Columbia University Libraries is one of the top ten academic library systems in the nation, with 9.2 million volumes, over 65,650 serials, as well as extensive collections of electronic resources, manuscripts, rare books, microforms, and other nonprint formats. The collections and services are organized into 25 libraries, supporting specific academic or professional disciplines. Columbia Libraries employs more than 400 professional and support staff to assist faculty, students, and researchers in their academic endeavors. The Libraries’ website at http://www.columbia.edu/cu/lweb/ is a gateway to its print and electronic collections and to its services.

The Columbia Libraries' new Center for Digital Research and Scholarship advances the use of new media and digital technologies in research and scholarly communication. Areas of particular focus include: electronic publishing, scholarly communication policy and practice, scholarly database development, Columbia’s research repository, academic web site development and design and video services.

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7/11/07 LMK