Winners of the 2012 Bancroft Prize Announced


hyde

The winners are Anne F. Hyde, Empires, Nations, and Families: A History of the North American West, 1800–1860 (University of Nebraska Press, 2011); Daniel T. Rodgers, Age of Fracture (Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 2011); and Tomiko Brown-Nagin, Courage to Dissent: Atlanta and the Long History of the Civil Rights Movement (Oxford University Press, 2011).

The winning works, while disparate in subject matter, demonstrate the powerful impact of re-examination of historical events in an ever-changing, ever-evolving world.

Columbia Provost John H. Coatsworth will present the awards at the Bancroft Prize dinner next month, hosted by the department of history and Columbia University Libraries. The Bancroft Prize, which includes an award of $10,000 to each author, is administered by University Librarian and Vice President for Information Services, James G. Neal.

Rodgers

Tomiko Brown-Nagin is the T. Munford Boyd Professor of Law and Justice Thurgood Marshall Distinguished Professor of Law at the University of Virginia Law School. She teaches courses on American social and legal history, constitutional law, education law and policy and public interest law. She has written widely on civil rights history and law and published in both law and history journals.

The Bancroft Prize was established at Columbia University in 1948 with a bequest from Frederic Bancroft, a preeminent historian, librarian, author, and Columbia University lecturer.  It is considered one of the most distinguished academic awards in the field of history.

brown_nagin

Tomiko Brown-Nagin is the T. Munford Boyd Professor of Law and Justice Thurgood Marshall Distinguished Professor of Law at the University of Virginia Law School. She teaches courses on American social and legal history, constitutional law, education law and policy and public interest law. She has written widely on civil rights history and law and published in both law and history journals.

The Bancroft Prize was established at Columbia University in 1948 with a bequest from Frederic Bancroft, a preeminent historian, librarian, author, and Columbia University lecturer.  It is considered one of the most distinguished academic awards in the field of history.

Columbia University Libraries/Information Services is one of the top five academic research library systems in North America. The collections include over 11 million volumes, over 150,000 journals and serials, as well as extensive electronic resources, manuscripts, rare books, microforms, maps, and graphic and audio-visual materials. The services and collections are organized into 22 libraries and various academic technology centers. The Libraries employs more than 500 professional and support staff. The website of the Libraries is the gateway to its services and resources: library.columbia.edu.